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2010s

Cool history events this week — July 19, 2017

World War I, The Hunger Games and Prohibition are on tap in Louisville this week.

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Election fraud in its purest form: the 1905 Louisville mayoral election

Did you know that in 1907 the Kentucky Court of Appeals actually threw out the results of a mayoral election in Louisville? Just chucked it. Nope. No mayor for you!

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Emilie Todd Helm, younger sister of Mary Todd Lincoln.

Emilie Todd Helm and her big sister, Mary Todd Lincoln: Civil War widows

Guest post by Samantha Sayre Taylor The Mary Todd Lincoln House, 578 W. Main St., Lexington, stands apart from its surroundings; an old woman surrounded by the young and mighty …

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3 really cool history events in Louisville this week

Living in Louisville, we’re pretty lucky when it comes to history events. Here are three author speaking events you might want to check out. If you can’t, you might want to order the books because they all look really interesting!

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Devil Dan: The Admiral’s rescue kitten that guarded the U.S. Treasury

While browsing through the Courier-Journal’s archives, I’ve learned that the best stuff is deep in the inside pages. For example, this story from Oct. 3, 1899:   Apparently, the kitten …

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Louisville’s bi-sexual heiress: Henrietta Bingham

Henrietta Bingham was born into the Bingham family, one of the wealthiest in Louisville. She was bi-sexual at a time when alternative lifestyles weren’t celebrated, and she suffered the consequences.

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Adolf Rupp and race: Author to lecture at the Filson Tuesday night

Hey sports fans, interested in basketball history? The Filson Historical Society has a fascinating¬†lecture Tuesday night. From the Filson website: In the 1966 NCAA basketball championship game, an all-white University …

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George Keats of Kentucky — the ‘Money brother’ of John Keats, poet

Anyone who’s taken an English literature survey in college knows about the romantic poet John Keats. But while John was becoming¬†famous for “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” his brother George …

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Louisville court cases from 1899

  I found this court docket from 1899 in the Courier-Journal. It paints an interesting portrait of our court system back then, as well as the language of newspaper and, …

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1893: Louisville’s Big Four Bridge collapses, 40 die

In my browsing of bridge history in Louisville, I learned that the Big Four Bridge, which once carried trains across the Ohio River between Louisville and Jeffersonville, collapsed during construction. …

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100 years ago today …

A hen lays 74 eggs, and a man falls down an elevator shaft.

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The Czar and his father … and chuckleheads in Kansas

  Found this gem in the Courier-Journal, March 28, 1890. The czar they are referencing is Czar Alexander III. His father, Czar Alexander II was assassinated. Alex Dos was taken …

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Desegregating our parks: Two Louisville teachers tried in 1924

Two black teachers took their students to Iroquois Park in 1924 and were arrested.

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The amazing life of Mae Street Kidd, Louisville state representative

In a recent grad school class, I was asked to read Passing for Black: The Life and Careers of Mae Street Kidd by Wade Hall (1997-11-25) by Wade Hall. I …

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The Bridges of Jefferson County

The biggest thing to happen to Louisville’s and Southern Indiana’s traffic scene lately is the building and opening of two new Bridges, the Abraham Lincoln Bridge downtown on I-65 and …

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